Legislation

1802

Factory Act 1802

Act for the preservation of the Health and Morals of Apprentices and others employed in Cotton and other Mills, and Cotton and other Factories 1802

This is the first Act of the Parliament in the UK intended to protect the welfare of people at work. Towards the end of the 18th century the increasing pace of industrial revolution and its concentration of labour in factories and mills utilising powered technology had brought with it growing publicity about the conditions of those – in particular children) employed in such establishment.

Sir Robert Peel introduced the Bill in 1802, passed the same year with little or no opposition, largely in consequence of the revelations of the abuse of children in textile mills.

The Act was directed to the due cleansing of such premises by two washings with quicklime yearly, to the admission of fresh air by means of a sufficient number of windows, and to the yearly supply to every apprentice of sufficient and suitable clothing and sleeping accommodation (not more than two to a bed).

The pauper apprentices were prohibited from night work, and their labour limited to 12 hours in a day.

Most importantly the Act provided that the apprentices should be instructed in reading, writing, arithmetic and the principles of the Christian religion and that those who were members of the Church of England should be examined annually by a clergyman, and be prepared at the proper age for confirmation.

The Magistrates were to appoint two inspectors from amongst themselves (one being a clergyman) to visit factories and mills annually and such premises in the locality were to be registered with the Clerk to the Justices.

1819, 1825, 1831

The pieces of legislation were intended to fortify the 1802 Act, which was widely evaded. The 1831 Act imposed a maximum 12 hour day for all young persons in cotton mills. It too was evaded.

1833

Factories Act 1833

Pressure from the “Ten Hours Movement” resulted in the Factory Act 1833.

This Act whilst maintaining a 12 hour day for all young persons, was extended to woollen and linen mills. Most significantly, in order to prevent further evasion, it provided for enforcement by Government appointed inspectors.

Four inspectors were initially appointed. The Act gave them powers of entry, power to make regulations, and the enforcement powers of the Magistrates.

1842

Coal Mines Act 1842

This Act prohibited the women and children from underground work. The radical nature of this measure undoubtedly eased the way for the milder Factories Act of 1844.

1844

Factories Act 1844

This required safeguarding of mill gearing and prohibited the cleaning of machinery in motion.

1844 to 1856

Between 1844 and 1856 a succession of seven factory statues and subordinate regulations provided for the safety of children young person and women, including provision for the fencing of machinery, hours, mealtimes and holidays.

1847

Factories Act 1847

Also known as the Ten Hours Act. Stipulated that as of 1 July 1847, women and children between the ages of 13 and 18 could work only 63 hours per week.

1850

Coal Mines Inspection Act 1850

This act together with the Factories Act 1844 were significant in giving the Home Secretary power to award part of any fine imposed on an employer to a worker injured by the criminal breach. This form of compensation was not used extensively and fell into virtual disuse by the end of the century, being finally abolished in 1959.

1856

Factories Act 1856

Under pressure from factory owners the 1856 Act relaxed some of the requirements of the 1844 Act.

This Act redefined the workday which had been established under the Factory Acts of 1844 and 1847. No longer could employers decide the hours of work. The workday was changed to correspond with the maximum number of hours that women and children could work. The act included the following provisions:

Children and women could only work from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the summer and 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. in the winter. All work would end on Saturday at 2 p.m. The work week was extended from 58 hours to 60 hours. Hours of work for ages 9 to 18 was changed to 10 hours night and day.

1864, 1867

Specified non-textile factories, including pottery, match-making, foundries, blast furnaces, copper mills and all manufacturing processes employing more than 50 people, and workshops were subjected to some of the statutory requirements.

1872

Mines Act

This provided for the imprisonment as a penal sanction, a means of enforcement continued in the subsequent mines statutes, but not extended for a hundred years to other legislation which relied on fines as the penal sanction.

1875

Explosives Act 1875

This Act introduced a system for the licensing and regulation of factories for the production of gunpowder and other explosives.

This was superseded by the Explosives Act 1923.

1878

Factory and Workshop Act 1878

This Act brought all the previous Acts together in one consolidation. This Act may be said to be the first attempt at comprehensive factory legislation. Now the Factory Code applied to all trades. No child anywhere under the age of 10 was to be employed and compulsory education for children up to 10 years old was established. 10–14 year olds could only be employed for half days. Women were to work no more than 56 hours per week.

1878

Threshing Machines Act 1878

First legislative steps directed towards safety in agriculture.

1880

Employers’ Liability Act 1880

The Employers’ Liability Act extended protection to workers concerning accidents caused by the negligence of managers, superintendents and foremen. Railway companies were also made liable when their employees were injured through the negligence of signalmen, drivers and pointsmen. However, the act did not protect employees against accidents caused by fellow workers.

1891

Factory Act 1891

Made the requirements for fencing machinery more stringent. Under the heading Conditions of Employment were two considerable additions to previous legislation: the first is the prohibition on employers to employ women within four weeks after confinement; the second the raising the minimum age at which a child can be set to work from ten to eleven.

1897

Chaff-Cutting Machines (Accidents) Act 1897

Despite the increasing mechanization of the industry, workers in agriculture enjoyed no statutory protection save in the limited area covered by this Act and the Threshing Machines Act 1878, since the Factories Acts did not apply.

Workman’s Compensation Act 1897

Introduced scale payments by employers to employees in certain industries who suffered injury “arising out of and in the course of employment”.

1901

Factory and Workshop Act 1901

A fresh attempt at the rationalisation of factory legislation. It was followed by a series of detail regulations, many still in force. (May alter after the 2011 Lofstedt review of legislation). This Act remained the principal statute for the regulation of factories until its repeal by the Factories Act 1937.

1911

Mines Act 1911

This comprehensive Act following earlier comprehensive legislation in 1872 and 1888.

1923

Explosives Act 1923

This superseded the Explosives Act 1875.

1926

Lead Paint (Protection against Poisoning) Act 1926

This was repealed and replaced by the Factories Act 1961.

1936

Employment of Women and Young Persons Act 1936

This was repealed and replaced by the Factories Act 1961.

1937

Factories Act 1937

Repealed and replaced the Factory and Workshops Act 1901 to 1929. This Act provided, for the first time, a comprehensive code for safety, health and welfare applicable to all factories alike irrespective of whether they were textile or non-textile factories and whether mechanical power was used or not.

The Factories Act 1937 was amended by the Factories Acts 1948 and 1959 and these in turn were repealed and replaced by the Factories Act 1961.

1952

Agriculture (Poisonous Substances) Act 1952

Established the framework for the issuing of regulations concerning poisonous substances used in agriculture. Contents: protection of employees against risks of poisoning; duties of employees; inspectors; offences and penalties; provisions of samples. Substances to which this Law applied: dinitrophenols and their salts; dinitro-substituted phenols and their salts; organophosphorus compounds; other substances judged dangerous by the authorities.

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/Geo6and1Eliz2/15-16/60

Repealed by S.I. 1996/3022; www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1996/3022/made

1954

Mines and Quarries Act 1954

This Act imposed the most extensive safety regime in any industry. It extended not only regulation in relation to equipment, places, access, egress, processes, specific hazards and methods of working but also laid statutory duties on mine managers; required pit deputies to make inspections, gave workmen’s inspectors power of inspection, and extended the functions of the Inspectors of Mines.

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/Eliz2/2-3/70/introduction

1956

Agriculture (Safety, Health and Welfare Provisions) Act 1956

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/Eliz2/4-5/49

This Act introduced comprehensive health protection and safeguards for agricultural workers and for children who may come into contact with agricultural machinery, equipment or vehicles. It prohibited the lifting of excessive weights, outlined the general provisions that must be made for sanitary conveniences and washing facilities and stipulated requirements for first aid provision.

The Act also laid down requirements for the notification and investigation of accidents and diseases. It was instrumental in appointing a number of inspectors with the powers to enter agricultural premises and enforce the Act.

Repealed by Agriculture (Safety, Health and Welfare Provisions) Act 1956 (Repeals and Modifications) Regulations 1975S.I. 1975 No. 46

1959

Nuclear Installations Act 1959

This Act brought about the establishment of the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate within the Ministry of Power.

Today’s Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) is responsible for the UK safety regulation of nuclear power stations, nuclear chemical plants, defence nuclear facilities, nuclear safety research, decommissioning and strategy.

Since 2 April 2007 NII has also been responsible for civil nuclear operational security and safeguards matters.

1960

Offices Act 1960

Since 1886 shopworkers’ hours had been regulated and since 1904 local authorities had powers to limit opening hours of shops, but no other statutory protection extended to shop workers and none at all to office workers. The Gowers Committee had in 1949 recommended extensions and in 1960 a private members’ bill had become the Offices Act 1960. In 1963 this was repealed and replaced by the Offices, Shops and Railway Premises Act 1963. That Act gave statutory protection to the largest remaining group of unprotected workers.

Radioactive Substances Act 1960

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/Eliz2/8-9/34/introduction

1961

Factories Act 1961

Contained power to make regulations governing dangerous processes and plant.

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/Eliz2/9-10/34/introduction

1963

Offices, Shops and Railway Premises Act 1963

This Act gave statutory protection to the largest remaining group of unprotected workers.

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1963/41/introduction

1965

Construction (Notice of Operations and Works) Order 1965 – S.I. 1965 No. 221

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1965/221

1966

Construction (Working Places) Regulations 1966 – S.I. 1966 No. 94

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1966/94

1969

Employers’ Liability (Compulsory Insurance) Act

Required that all employers carry insurance to cover potential liability to employees.

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1969/57/introduction

Asbestos Regulations 1969 – S.I. 1969 No. 690

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1969/690/contents/made

Employers’ Liability (Defective Equipment) Act 1969

Provided that the employer is liable in negligence for injury caused by defective equipment notwithstanding that the fault was that of a third party manufacturer or supplier.

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1969/37/introduction

1971

Fire Precautions Act 1971

Brought together provisions in a number of unrelated pieces of legislation dealing with particular classes of premises and particular activities and was extended to all factory, office, shop and railway premises by the Fire Precautions (Factories, Offices, Shop and Railway Premises) Order 1989S.I. 1989 No. 76

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1971/40/introduction

1972

Employment Medical Advisory Service Act 1972

This act amends and complements the Factories Act 1961 in relation to medical arrangements. It makes provision for the establishment of an employment medical advisory service and the appointment of employment medical advisers to replace factory doctors. It prescribes their functions and responsibilities in relation to the medical welfare of factory employees. Schedules indicating the provisions of the Factories Act 1961, amendments and repealed sections concerning employment of medical advisers are included.

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1972/28/introduction

1974

Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974

The Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 was described as “a bold and far-reaching piece of legislation” by HSE’s first Director General, John Locke. It certainly marked a departure from the framework of prescribed and detailed regulations which was in place at the time.

The Act introduced a new system based on less-prescriptive and more goal-based regulations, supported by guidance and codes of practice. For the first time employers and employees were to be consulted and engaged in the process of designing a modern health and safety system.

The Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 also established the Health and Safety Commission (HSC) for the purpose of proposing new regulations, providing information and advice and conducting research.

HSC’s operating arm, the Health and Safety Executive was formed shortly after in order to enforce health and safety law, a duty shared with Local Authorities.

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1974/37

1975

Agriculture (Safety, Health and Welfare Provisions) Act 1956 (Repeals and Modifications) Regulations 1975 – S.I. 1975 No. 46

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1975/46/made

1977

Safety Representatives and Safety Committees Regulations 1977 (S.I. 1977/500)

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1977/500

These regulations established the right of a recognised trade union to appoint safety representatives from among the employees it represented. The exception to this was employees of mines, specifically coal mines as defined by section 180 of the Mines and Quarries Act 1954. The regulations conferred number of powers to safety representatives including: “to investigate potential hazards and dangerous occurrences at the workplace (whether or not they are drawn to his attention by the employees he represents) and to examine the causes of accidents at the workplace”; “to make representations to the employer on general matters affecting the health, safety or welfare of the employees at the workplace”; and to inspect certain documents. Under the terms of the regulations, two or more safety representatives could request their employer to establish a safety committee. The regulations also outlined the terms for pay for time off allowed to safety representatives carrying out official duties.

1979

Pneumoconiosis (Workers’ Compensation) Act 1979

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1979/41/introduction

1980

Notification of Accidents and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1980 – S.I. 1980 No. 637

The Notification of Accidents and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1980 (NADOR) required employers and the self-employed to keep a record of any accidents or certain types of dangerous occurrences and report these to HSE. The Regulations include lists of the types of dangerous occurrences that are reportable, including those that occur in any situation and those that relate specifically to mines, quarries and railways. Today, the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulation 1995 (RIDDOR) has replaced NADOR. For more information about what is reportable under RIDDOR and what employers, employees, the self employed and gas suppliers and fitters are obliged to do under the Regulations, visit the RIDDOR pages on the HSE Website.

Control of Lead at Work Regulations 1980 – S.I. 1980 No. 1248

The Regulations stipulated that where employees are exposed to lead in the workplace, employers or those who are self-employed must assess the work in order to establish the nature and degree of the exposure to lead. Employers are also required to provide information, training and instruction to exposed workers. Other requirements under the Regulations included: ensuring control measures are in place for material, plant and processes and that these are properly maintained; providing washing and changing facilities and areas for employees to eat, drink and smoke; avoiding the spread of contamination; cleaning; air monitoring; and conducting medical surveillance and biological tests. For more information about lead, see the Lead pages on the HSE Website

1981

Diving Operations at Work Regulations 1981 – S.I. 1981 No. 399

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1981/399

Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981 – S.I. 1981 No. 917

These Regulations which came into force on 1st July 1982 stipulated that “an employer shall provide or ensure that there are provided, such equipment and facilities as are adequate and appropriate in the circumstances for enabling first aid to be rendered to his employees if they are injured or become ill at work.” Employers were also required to inform employees about the arrangements in place for providing first-aid, including the location of facilities, personnel and equipment. Self-employed people were also covered by the Regulations as there was a requirement for them to provide appropriate and adequate equipment for rendering first aid to themselves at work, if necessary.

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1981/917/introduction/made

1983

Asbestos (Licensing) Regulations 1983 – S.I. 1983 No. 1649

The Asbestos (Licensing) Regulations 1983 came into force on 1 August 1983 and have been amended by several pieces of legislation in the intervening years. At the time the Regulations became law, no-one could carry out work with asbestos insulation including asbestos insulation board or asbestos coating unless they held a licence granted by HSE or worked for someone who held such a licence. There were three exemptions to the requirements, namely: collecting samples or air monitoring to identify asbestos; work carried out with asbestos insulation, asbestos insulating board or asbestos coating by employers or the self-employed, either by themselves or by using their own employees and in their own premises; and work of short duration using these materials. For more information about present day requirements for working with asbestos, visit the Asbestos pages on the HSE Website.

Health and Safety (Genetic Manipulation) Regulations 1978

HSE assumed responsibility for enforcing the Health and Safety (Genetic Manipulation) Regulations 1978 from the Department of Education and Science in 1983. In March 1984 a new Advisory Committee on Genetic Manipulation (ACGM) was set up to support this new role. In its first year, ACGM set up working parties to investigate: the release of genetically manipulated organisms for agricultural and environmental purposes; the uses of viruses in genetic manipulation, including the use of recombinants containing potentially harmful nucleic acid sequences; and monitoring of workers involved in genetic manipulation work. In 2004, ACGM was replaced by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Genetic Modification (Contained Use), (SACGM(CU)). SACGM(CU) provides technical and scientific advice to the UK Competent Authority on all aspects of the human and environmental risks of the contained use of genetically modified organisms.

1984

Classification, Packaging and Labelling of Dangerous Substances Regulations 1984 – S.I. 1984 No. 1244

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1984/1244/contents/made

Control of Industrial Major Accident Hazard Regulations 1984 – S.I. 1984 No. 1902

The Regulations, known as COMAH, require that safe operation can be demonstrated for industrial activities in which various substances as defined in Schedule I of the Regulations are involved. They also set out requirements for isolated storage of substances in Schedule 2 of the Regulations. Under the Regulations, manufacturers are required to provide written evidence that major accident hazards have been identified and the necessary steps put in place to prevent major incidents and protect workers on the site. They also are required to prepare an off-site emergency plan to complement the Local Authority emergency plan and to provide information to the Local Authority which can be used to inform people living in the locality who might be affected by a COMAH site.

1985

Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1985 – S.I. 1985 No. 2023

The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1985, commonly known as ‘RIDDOR’, require a ‘responsible person’ to notify the enforcing authority where a person dies or sustains any injuries or specific medical conditions or where a dangerous occurrence takes place in connection with a work activity. The Regulations set out the specific injuries which are reportable including fractures, amputation, decompression sickness and others. A list of the dangerous occurrences reportable under RIDDOR is provided in Schedule 1 of the Regulations, while a second schedule sets out reportable diseases under RIDDOR. Separate notification requirements for mines, quarries and railways are also explained

1985 Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 – S.I. 1985 No 1333

The Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 applied to any work with ionising radiation except work carried out under section 1 of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 and in certain activities as outlined in Schedule 3 of the Regulations. The Regulations set out legal duties in the following areas: dose limitation including restriction of exposure; designation of controlled areas and of classified persons; appointment of qualified persons; training and instruction requirements; dosimetry and medical surveillance; control of radioactive substances including arrangements for personal protective equipment and washing and changing facilities; assessment of hazards; investigation of cases of overexposure; and fees for medical examinations.

1986

HSE starts to enforce pesticide safety – Control of Pesticides Regulations 1986 – S.I. 1986 No. 1510

The Control of Pesticides Regulations 1986 (S.I. 1986/1510) conferred authority on HSE to enforce pesticide safety. The Regulations provided a detailed list of those types of pesticides which are subject to control and those which are excluded. They also outlined the approvals required before any pesticides could be sold, stored, used, supplied or advertised. In addition, the Regulations set out the general conditions for pesticides regarding sale, supply, storage, advertisement and use, including aerial application. The Regulations were superseded by the Control of Pesticides Regulations 1997 (S.I. 1997/188). More information about HSE’s role in enforcing pesticides safety can be found on the HSE Website.

1987

Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations 1987 – S.I. 1987 No. 2115

These regulations stipulate that an employer ‘shall not carry out any work which exposes or is liable to expose any of his employees to asbestos unless either a) before commencing that work he has identified, by analysis or otherwise, the type of asbestos involved in the work; or b) he has assumed that the asbestos is crocidolite or amosite and for the purposes of the Regulations has treated it accordingly’. Under the Regulations, employers must notify the enforcing authority of work with asbestos in certain circumstances. They must also provide information, instruction and training for employees who are liable to be exposed to asbestos during the course of their work. Adequate control measures must be in place and must be adequately maintained to prevent or reduce the spread of asbestos. Other requirements of the regulations include: ensuring cleanliness of plant and premises; designation of areas where asbestos is present; air monitoring including associated record-keeping; medical surveillance and keeping health records; provision of washing and changing facilities; and storage and labelling of raw asbestos and asbestos waste.

1988

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations – S.I. 1988 No. 1657

The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations, generally referred to as the COSHH Regulations, were introduced to protect the health of people arising from work activities. Under the Regulations, employers must carry out a risk assessment to ensure that employees are not exposed to substances which will be hazardous to their health. Where exposure to such substances cannot be prevented, employers must provide suitable protective equipment and control measures and they must ensure that such equipment is adequately maintained, examined and tested and the results of tests recorded and kept. RIDDOR stipulates a requirement for monitoring exposure in the workplace and maintaining suitable records. It also sets out requirements for health surveillance and medical surveillance. Employers are also obliged to ensure that where exposure to hazardous substance is unavoidable, workers are made aware of the associated health risks and the precautions that should be taken including any associated instruction and training requirements.

1989

Fire Precautions (Factories, Offices, Shop and Railway Premises) Order 1989 – SI 1989 No. 76

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1989/76/made

Control of Industrial Air Pollution (Registrations of Works) Regulations 1989 – S.I. 1989 No. 318

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1989/318/made

Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 – S.I. 1989/635

The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 had a wide remit, covering: work systems, protective equipment and work activities; adverse or hazardous environments; capability and strength of electrical equipment; earthing and other suitable precautions; electrical protection, insulation and placing of conductors; connections; integrity of conductors; cutting off electrical supply and isolation; working on dead equipment; working on or in the vicinity of live conductors; working space, lighting and access; and competent persons. A section of the Regulations applied only to Mines, covering areas such as: introduction of electrical equipment; restrictions in certain underground zones; provisions associated with the presence of firedamp; approval of certain equipment in safety-lamp mines; cutting off electricity to circuits underground; oil-filled equipment; electric shock notices; information and records; use of battery-powered locomotives and vehicles into safety-lamp mines; and storage, transfer and charging of electrical storage batteries.

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1989/635/made

Health and Safety Information for Employees Regulations 1989 – S.I. 1989 No. 682

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1989/682/made

Noise at Work Regulations 1989 – S.I. 1989 No. 1790

The Noise at Work Regulations 1989 stipulate that ‘Every employer shall reduce the risk of damage to the hearing of his employees from exposure to noise to the lowest level reasonably practicable’. To this end, the Regulations require that a noise assessment should be made if employees are likely to be exposed to the first action level or above or to the peak action level of noise. The assessment should be reviewed as appropriate and adequate assessment records kept.

Where employees are exposed to noise, adequate ear protection must be provided and ear protection zones set up where necessary. Any equipment provided must be carefully maintained and used and employees should be given information on the steps they can take to protect their hearing in the workplace. The Regulations also outline the particular modifications of the duties of manufacturers of articles for use at work and articles of fairground equipment in relation to the Regulations.

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1989/1790/made

Health and Safety (Enforcing Authority) Regulations 1989 – S.I. 1989 No. 1903

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1989/1903/made

Construction (Head Protection) Regulations 1989 – S.I. 1989 No. 2209

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1989/2209/made

1990

Control of Asbestos in the Air Regulations 1990 – S.I. 1990 No. 556

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1990/556/made

Health and Safety (Training for Employment) Regulations 1990 – S.I. 1990 No. 1380

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1990/1380/made

1992

‘Six pack’ regulations

There are 6 “daughter” directives/regulations:

Genetically Modified Organisms (Contained Use) Regulations 1992 – S.I. 1992 No. 3217

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1992/3217/made

Diving Operations at Work (Amendment) Regulations 1992 – S.I. 1992 No. 608

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1992/608/made

1993

The Notification of New Substances Regulations 1993 – S.I. 1993 No. 3050

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1993/3050/made

Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging) Regulations 1993 – S.I. 1993 No. 1746

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1993/1746/made

Management and Administration of Safety and Health at Mines Regulations 1993 – S.I. 1993 No. 1897

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1993/1897/made

Ionising Radiations (Outside Workers) Regulations 1993 – S.I. 1993 No. 2379

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1993/2379/made

Personal Protective Equipment (EC Directive) (Amendment) Regulations 1993 – S.I. 1993 No. 3074

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1993/3074/made

1994

Control of Industrial Major Accident Hazards (Amendment) Regulations 1994 – S.I. 1994 No. 118

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1994/118/made

Batteries and Accumulators (Containing Dangerous Substances) Regulations 1994 – S.I. 1994 No. 232

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1994/232/made

Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road and Rail (Classification, Packaging and Labelling) Regulations 1994 – S.I. 1994 No. 669

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1994/669/made

Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 1994 – S.I. 1994 No. 3140

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1994/3140/made

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 1994 – S.I. 1994 No. 3246

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1994/3246/made

1995

Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 – S.I. 1995 No. 3163

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1995/3163/made

1996

Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply (Amendment) Regulations 1996 – S.I. 1996 No. 1092

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1996/1092/made

Construction (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1996 – 1996 No. 1592

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1996/1592/made

Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Rail Regulations 1996 – S.I. 1996 No. 2089

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1996/2089/made

Packaging and Labelling and Carriage of Radioactive Material by Rail Regulations 1996 – S.I. 1996 No. 2090

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1996/2090/made

Carriage of Dangerous Goods (Classification, Packaging and Labelling) and Use of Transportable Pressure Receptables Regulations 1996 – S.I. 1996 No. 2092

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1996/2092/made

Carriage of Explosives by Road Regulations 1996 – S.I. 1996 No. 2093

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1996/2093/made

Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (Driver Training) Regulations 1996 – S.I. 1996 No. 2094

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1996/2094/made

Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road Regulations 1996 – S.I. 1996 No. 2095

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1996/2095/made

Health and Safety (Repeals and Revocations) Regulations 1996 – S.I. 1996 No. 3022

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1996/3022/made

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (Amendment) Regulations 1996 – S.I. 1996 No. 3188

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1996/3188/made

1997

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (Amendment) Regulations 1997 – S.I. 1997 No. 11

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1997/11/made

Lift Regulations 1997 – S.I. 1997 No. 831

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1997/831/made

Confined Spaces Regulations 1997 – S.I. 1997 No. 1713

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1997/1713/made

Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) (Amendment) Regulations 1997 – S.I. 1997 No. 1460

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1997/1460/made

Diving at Work Regulations 1997 – S.I. 1997 No. 2776

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1997/2776/made

1998

Health and Safety (Enforcing Authority) Regulations 1998 – S.I. 1998 No. 494

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/494/made

Control of Lead at Work Regulations 1998 – S.I. 1998 No. 543

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/543/made

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (Amendment) Regulations 1998 – S.I. 1998 No. 1357

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/1357/made

Electrical Equipment for Explosive Atmospheres (Certification) (Amendment) (No. 2) Regulations 1998 – S.I. 1998 No. 1469

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/1469/made

Genetically Modified Organisms (Contained Use) (Amendment) Regulations 1998 – S.I. 1998 No. 1548

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/1548/made

Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 – S.I. 1998 No. 2306

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/2306/made

Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998 – S.I. 1998 No. 2451

The first of the general provisions of the Regulations covered qualification and supervision and states that ‘No person shall carry out work in relation to a gas fitting or gas storage vessel unless he is competent to do so’. The Regulations imposed a duty on employers to ensure that people carrying out work on gas installations have been approved by HSE under regulation 3(3) of these Regulations. Requirements for materials and workmanship, protection against damage, existing gas fittings as well as general safety precautions are also outlined in the Regulations.

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/2451/made

Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) (Amendment) Regulations 1998 – S.I. 1998 No. 3106

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/3106/made

Control of Asbestos at Work (Amendment) Regulations 1998 – S.I. 1998 No. 3235

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/3235/made

1999

Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 1999 – S.I. 1999 No. 743

The Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 1999 (CIMAH) set out the responsibilities of operators of plants where scheduled hazardous chemicals are used, to prevent major accidents and limit the consequences of major accidents to people and the environment. The regulations require operators to formulate a major accident prevention policy and also to notify the competent authority at the start of the construction of a plant handling scheduled chemicals and at the end, when the plant is being decommissioned or the chemicals are no longer present on site. The regulations also require retailed safety reports to be sent to the competent authority and for operators to produce emergency plans in consultation with local authorities. In addition, operators must provide information to the public with regard to local safety measures and actions to take in the event of a major accident at a CIMAH site.

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1999/743/made

2000

Pressure Systems Safety Regulations 2000 – S.I. 2000 No. 128

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2000/128/made

Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000 – S.I. 2000 No. 1059

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2000/1059/made

Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) (Amendment) Regulations 2000 – S.I. 2000 No. 2381

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2000/2381/made

Dangerous Substances and Preparations (Safety) (Consolidation) and Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) (Amendment) Regulations 2000 – S.I. 2000 No. 2897

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2000/2897/made

Batteries and Accumulators (Containing Dangerous Substances) (Amendment) Regulations – S.I. 2000 No. 3097

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2000/3097/made

2001

Biocidal Products Regulations 2001 – S.I. 2001 No. 880

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2001/880/made

Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 (Application outside Great Britain) Order 2001 – S.I. 2001 No. 2127

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2001/2127/made

Batteries and Accumulators (Containing Dangerous Substances) (Amendment) Regulations 2001 – S.I. 2001 No. 2551

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2001/2551/made

Radiation (Emergency Preparedness and Public Information) Regulations 2001 – S.I. 2001 No. 2975

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2001/2975/made

2002

Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 (Application to Environmentally Hazardous Substances) Regulations 2002 – S.I. 2002 No. 282

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2002/282/made

Personnel Protective Equipment Regulations 2002 – S.I. 2002 No. 1144

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2002/1144/made

Pressure Equipment (Amendment) Regulations 2002 – S.I. 2002 No. 1267

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2002/1267/made

Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) Regulations 2002 – S.I. 2002 No. 1689

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2002/1689/made

Packaging, Labelling and Carriage of Radioactive Material by Rail Regulations 2002 – S.I. 2002 No. 2099

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2002/2099/made

Control of Lead at Work Regulations 2002 – S.I. 2002 No. 2676

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2002/2676/made

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 – S.I. 2002 No. 2677

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2002/2677/made

Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002 – S.I. 2002 No. 2776

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2002/2776/made

2003

Fireworks Act 2003

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2003/22/introduction

Biocidal Products (Amendment) Regulations 2003 – S.I. 2003 No. 429

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2003/429/made

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (Amendment) Regulations 2003 – S.I. 2003 No. 978

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2003/978/made

Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Transportable Pressure Vessels (Amendment) Regulations 2003 – S.I. 2003 No. 1431

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2003/1431/made

Management of Health and Safety at Work and Fire Precautions Workplace) (Amendment) Regulations 2003 – S.I. 2003 No. 2457

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2003/2457/made

2004

Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 (Application to Environmentally Hazardous Substances) (Amendment) Regulations 2004 – S.I. 2004 No. 463

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2004/463/made

Good Laboratory Practice (Codification Amendments Etc.) Regulations 2004 – S.I. 2004 No. 994

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2004/994/made

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (Amendment) Regulations 2004 – S.I. 2004 No. 3386

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2004/3386/made

Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment Regulations 2004 – S.I. 2004 No. 568

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2004/568/made

2005

Work at Height Regulations 2005 – S.I. 2005 No. 735

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2005/735/made

Equipment and Protective Systems Intended for Use in Potentially Explosive Atmospheres (Amendment) Regulations 2005 – S.I. 2005 No. 830

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2005/830/made

Supply of Machinery (Safety) (Amendment) Regulations 2005 – S.I. 2005 No. 831

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2005/831/made

Export and Import of Dangerous Chemicals Regulations 2005 – S.I. 2005 No. 928

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2005/928/made

Manufacture and Storage of Explosives Regulations 2005 – S.I. 2005 No. 1082

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2005/1082/made

Control of Vibration at Work Regulations 2005 – S.I. 2005 No. 1093

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2005/1093/made

Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 (Application to Environmentally Hazardous Substances) (Amendment) Regulations 2005 – S.I. 2005 No. 1308

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2005/1308/made

Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 – S.I. 2005 No. 1541

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2005/1541/made

Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005 – S.I. 2005 No. 1643

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2005/1643/made

Control of Major Accident Hazards (Amendment) Regulations 2005 – S.I. 2005 No. 1088

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2005/1088/made

Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment (Amendment) Regulations 2005 – S.I. 2005 No. 1732

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2005/1732/made

2006

Management of Health and Safety at Work (Amendment) Regulations 2006 – S.I. 2006 No. 438

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2006/438/made

Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) (Amendment) Regulations 2006 – S.I. 2006 No. 2523

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2006/2523/made

Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006 – S.I. 2006 No. 2739

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2006/2739/made

2007

Work at Height (Amendment) Regulations 2007 – S.I. 2007 No. 114

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2007/114/made

Construction (Design and Management) Regulations (CDM 2007) – S.I. 2007 No. 320

The CDM Regulations combine the CDM Regulations 2004 and the Construction (Health Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1996 into one regulatory package, aimed at alleviating the previous complex and at times, bureaucratic approach taken by many duty holders. The aim of the CDM Regulations is to reduce the risk of harm to workers who build, use, maintain and demolish structures. Effective planning and management of construction projects, from design concept onwards is at the heart of the Regulations. The aim is for health and safety considerations to be treated as a normal part of a project’s development, not an afterthought or bolt-on extra. Find out more about the CDM Regulations

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2007/320/made

Manufacture and Storage of Explosives and the Health and Safety (Enforcing Authority) (Amendment and Supplementary Provisions) Regulations 2007 – S.I. 2007 No. 2598

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2007/2598/made

Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 (Application to Environmentally Hazardous Substances) (Amendment) Regulations 2007 – S.I. 2007 No. 1332

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2007/1332/made

Coal Mines (Control of Inhalable Dust) Regulations 2007 – S.I. 2007 No. 1894

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2007/1894/made

2008

Health and Safety (Offences) Act 2008

The Health and Safety (Offences) Act 2008 came into force on 16 January 2009. Under the provisions of the Act, offenders who break the law will be subjected to higher fines and longer sentences. The Act makes imprisonment an option for more health and safety offences in both the lower and higher courts. It also allows certain offences which at one time could only be tried in lower courts, be tried in the higher courts. However the main change which the Act has brought is to raise the maximum fine which may be imposed in the lower courts to £20,000 for most health and safety offences. Pesticides Safety Directorate transfers to HSE

Supply of Machinery (Safety) Regulations 2008 – S.I. 2008 No. 1597

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2008/1597/made

Health and Safety (Offences) Act 2008

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2008/20/contents

Export and Import of Dangerous Chemicals Regulations 2008 – S.I. 2008 No. 2108

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2008/2108/made

2009

Working Time (Amendment) Regulations 2009 – S.I. 2009 No. 1567

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2009/1567/made

Major Accident Off-Site Emergency Plan (Management of Waste from Extractive Industries) (England and Wales) Regulations 2009 – S.I. 2009 No. 1927

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2009/1927/made

Hazardous Waste (England and Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2009 – S.I. 2009 No. 507

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2009/507/made

Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases Regulations 2009 – S.I. 2009 No. 261

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2009/261/made

Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment Regulations 2009 – S.I. 2009 No. 1348

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2009/1348/made

2010

The Notification of Conventional Tower Cranes Regulations 2010 – S.I. 2010 No. 333

The Notification of Conventional Tower Cranes Regulations 2010 (S.I. 2010/333) came into force on 6 April 2010, requiring employers to inform HSE about conventional tower cranes that have been installed on construction sites. For newly erected cranes, the notification must take place within 14 days of thorough examination of the crane. Existing cranes that were already in place when the Regulations came into force must be registered within 28 days. The registration can be done electronically and must include the following information: details of the site address where the crane is located; name and address of the crane owners or lessors; crane identification details; the date of its thorough examination, details of the employer who commissioned the examination; and if any defects that pose a risk of serious injury were detected.

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2010/333/made

The Control of Artificial Optical Radiation at Work Regulations 2010 – S.I. 2010 No. 1140

Aims to protect workers from health risks associated with exposure to hazardous sources of artificial optical radiation (AOR). The Regulations require employers who may expose workers to AOR to assess the risk of adverse health effects of AOR to the skin or eyes. This assessment should include measurements or calculations for the levels of radiation to which employees are exposed. It must also assess the level, wavelength and duration of exposure. Employers are require to reduce or eliminate exposure to AOR where practicable, provide appropriate information and training for employees and ensure that exposed employees have their health monitored and receive medical examinations. HSE has produced ‘Guidance for Employers on the Control of Artificial Optical Radiation at Work Regulations (AOR) 2010’ for those employers who would like to find out more about their responsibilities under the Regulations.

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2010/1140/made

2012

Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012 – S.I. 2012 No. 632

The Regulations came into force in April 2012 and updated earlier asbestos regulations to take account of the fact that in the European Commission’s view, the UK had not completely implemented the EU Directive on exposure to asbestos as set out in EU Directive 2009/148/EC). The changes brought about by the new Regulations are fairly small and mostly affect some types of non-licensed work with asbestos including medical surveillance, record keeping and notification of work.

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2012/632/made

Health and Safety (Fees) Regulations 2012 – S.I. 2012 No. 1652

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2012/1652/made

Merchant Shipping (Accident Reporting and Investigation) Regulations 2012 – 2012 No. 1743

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2012/1743/made

2014

Mesothelioma Act 2014 – 2014 c. 1

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2014/1

Flexible Working Regulations 2014 – SI 2014 No. 1398

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2014/1398/made

Merchant Shipping (International Safety Management (ISM) Code) Regulations 2014 – SI 2014 No. 1512

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2014/1512/made

Explosives Regulations 2014 – SI 2014 No. 1638

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2014/1638/made

Control of Explosives Precursors Regulations 2014 – SI 2014 No. 1942

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2014/1942/made

2015

Modern Slavery Act 2015 – 2015 c. 30

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2015/30

Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 – SI 2015 No. 51

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2015/51/made

Ozone-Depleting Substances Regulations 2015 – SI 2015 No. 168

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2015/168/made

Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases Regulations 2015 – SI 2015 No. 310

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2015/310/made

Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 2015 – SI 2015 No. 483

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2015/483/made

National Minimum Wage Regulations 2015 – SI 2015 No. 621

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2015/621/made

Planning (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 2015 – SI 2015 No. 627

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2015/627/made

Gangmasters (Licensing Authority) Regulations 2015 – SI 2015 No. 805

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2015/805/made

Emissions Performance Standard Regulations 2015 – SI 2015 No. 933

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2015/933/made

Control of Poisons and Explosives Precursors Regulations 2015 – SI 2015 No. 966

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2015/966/made

2016

Welfare Reform and Work Act 2016 – 2016 c. 7

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2016/7

Trade Union Act 2016 – 2016 c. 15

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2016/15

Producer Responsibility Obligations (Packaging Waste) (Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 2016 – SI 2016 No. 241

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016/241/made

Passenger and Goods Vehicles (Tachographs) (Amendment) Regulations 2016 – SI 2016 No. 248

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016/248/made

Explosives Regulations 2014 (Amendment) Regulations 2016 – SI 2016 No. 315

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016/315/made

The Building (Amendment) Regulations 2016 – SI 2016 No. 490

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016/490/made

The Nuclear Installations (Liability for Damage) Order 2016 – SI 2016 No. 562

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016/562/made

Control of Electromagnetic Fields at Work Regulations 2016 – SI 2016 No. 588

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016/588/made

Nitrate Pollution Prevention Regulations 2015 – SI 2016 No. 668

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2015/668/made

Modern Slavery Act 2015 (Code of Practice) Regulations 2016 – SI 2016 No. 823

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016/823/made

The Climate Change Agreements (Administration) (Amendment and Related Provision) Regulations 2016 – SI 2016 No. 1189

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016/1189/made

The Nitrate Pollution Prevention (Amendment) Regulations 2016 – SI 2016 No. 1190

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016/1190/made

The Merchant Shipping and Fishing Vessels (Port Waste Reception Facilities) (Amendment) Regulations 2016 – SI 2016 No. 1211

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016/1211/made

The Nitrate Pollution Prevention (Amendment) (No. 2) Regulations 2016 – SI 2016 No. 1254

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016/1254/made